The interaction of vibratory traveling waves in rotating and stationary axisymmetric components is examined. In the most general case, a resonance can occur when the wave propagation speed in a first structure is equal in magnitude and direction to the rotational velocity of an adjacent structure. When a backward wave in a rotor appears stationary, a major resonance, as discussed in Wilfred Campbell's classic paper (Campbell, W., 1924, “The Protection of Steam Turbine Disc Wheels from Axial Vibrations,” Trans ASME, 46, pp. 31–160), results. A related resonance has been observed when the wave propagation speed in the stator is equal to the physical speed of the adjacent rotor. A third mechanism is derived for resonance between a wave in rotor 1 and a co- or counter-rotating rotor 2. Description of a component test which demonstrated this final phenomenon is provided.

References

References
1.
Campbell
,
W.
,
1924
, “
The Protection of Steam Turbine Disc Wheels From Axial Vibrations
,”
Trans. ASME
,
46
, pp.
31
160
.
2.
Macke
,
H. J.
,
1966
, “
Traveling-Wave Vibration of Gas-Turbine Engine Shells
,”
ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power
,
88
(
2
), pp.
179
187
.10.1115/1.3678502
3.
Alford
,
J. S.
,
1964
, “
Protection of Labyrinth Seals From Flexural Vibration
,”
ASME J. Eng. Power
,
86
, pp.
141
147
.10.1115/1.3677564
4.
GE Aircraft Engines, GE36 Project Dept.
,
1987
, “
Full Scale Technology Demonstration of a Modern Counter-Rotating Unducted Fan Engine-Design Report
,” NASA CR 180867, NASA Lewis Research Center, NAS 3-24210, pp.
105
116
.
You do not currently have access to this content.