Chevrons, which are also known as serrations, are initially developed to suppress jet noise radiating from aero-engine nozzles. The associated fluid mechanics are already well known. Compared to jet noise, turbomachinery fan noise has become relatively more important along with the ever-increasing bypass ratio. However, it is still unclear whether the trailing-edge chevrons on the bypass duct would attenuate fan noise and, if the answer is yes, what is the associated mechanism. In this work, we first use a theoretical model based on the Wiener-Hopf method to rapidly conduct parametric studies across a number of different set-ups. The results from such a theoretical model suggest that the chevrons are also effective in the reduction of fan noise scattering. Next, we perform high-fidelity computational fluid and acoustic simulations for a realistic aero-engine with some representative set-ups, and the results further confirm the effectiveness of chevrons. Both analytical and numerical results show the associated noise control mechanism, that is, chevrons would induce acoustic mode conversion (especially from low modes to high modes), which shall further results in evanescent waves in the radial direction and the final noise reduction at various radiation angles. The findings may find applications in next-generation low-noise aero-engine design.

This content is only available via PDF.

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this content.