A model to simulate flows ejected from cylindrical film cooling holes in 3D-CFD without meshing the cooling hole geometry has been developed. It uses a correlation-based prediction of the complete three-dimensional flow field in the vicinity of a film hole exit based on characteristic film cooling parameters that is presented in part I of this two-part paper. The model describes the film-jet in terms of its shape and the distribution of temperature and velocity components within the film-jet body. For example, the characteristic counter-rotating vortex pair in the film-jet is modeled. Adding source terms to the transport equations for mass, momentum, and energy locally, the correlation-based prediction of the film-jet flow field is imposed onto a 3D-CFD simulation. Source terms are specified in the vicinity of a film hole exit, within a region representative of the volume occupied by the film jet. Each node within this source volume is treated individually in order to model the complex flow structure of the film-jet. The model has successfully been implemented in a commercial CFD code. Its general applicability has been tested and proven. The model’s predictive capability is compared to detailed CFD calculations and experimental investigations. A grid requirement study has been conducted, showing that the film cooling model delivers reasonable predictions of the surface temperature distributions downstream of the ejection location using relatively coarse grids. A minimum grid resolution requirement has been identified.

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