A numerical simulation of the temperature rise for a three-dimensional rough surface sliding against a smooth surface in mixed lubricated contact has been developed. The effects of lubricant film friction and solid asperity friction are considered in the simulation. The moving grid method, which greatly reduces the required computer memory size and computing time, is used to solve the coefficient matrix of temperature equations. The time-dependent surface temperature rise at very small subregions is obtained. Different friction coefficients for lubricant shearing, surface film shearing and dry solid asperity contact are used to simulate the change of frictional heat in mixed lubricated contact. A critical temperature criterion is used to determine whether the friction coefficient is controlled by lubricant film, surface film, or dry solid asperity contact. Solutions for different contact conditions are presented for verification of the present simulation

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