A comparative study is reported to measure the actual performance of a zero-energy house (ZEH) of typical tract design. Ideally, a ZEH produces as much energy as it consumes in a year’s time. Two identically sized tract houses (149.6m2(1610ft2)) were constructed side by side in southwest Las Vegas, NV. One house is used as a base line (standard comparison) house and was built using conventional construction techniques. The other house, the ZEH, employs many energy saving features, solar power generation, and supplemental solar water heating. Both houses have been equipped with a network of sensors that measure virtually every aspect of energy usage in each home. Initially, both houses have been utilized as model homes in a tract housing development, so it was reasonable to believe that both experienced similar and consistent usage. Performance data are logged and are posted on the web. This paper describes the differences in construction details between the two houses. Results of monitoring are presented that contrast the performance of the two houses.

1.
Wilkinson
,
E.
, and
Boehm
,
R.
, 2005, “
Zero Energy House for the Southern Nevada Area
,”
Proceedings of the International Solar Energy Conference
,
Orlando, FL
,
International Solar Energy Society
.
2.
Kosny
,
J.
,
Kossecka
,
E.
,
Desjarlais
,
A.
, and
Christian
,
J.
, 2006, “
Dynamic Thermal Performance and Energy Benefits of Using Massive Walls in Residential Buildings
,” Oak Ridge National Laboratory Online Resource, http://www.ornl.gov/sci/roofs+walls/research/detailed_papers/dyn_perf/index.html 2006http://www.ornl.gov/sci/roofs+walls/research/detailed_papers/dyn_perf/index.html 2006.
3.
UNLV Center for Energy Research
, 2005, “
Report Documenting Energy Efficient Features
,” NREL Subcontract No. NCL-4–32455–06.
4.
Duffie
,
J.
, and
Beckman
,
W.
, 1991,
Solar Engineering of Thermal Processes
,
2nd ed.
,
Wiley
,
New York
.
You do not currently have access to this content.