Cerebral palsy is diagnosed in 1 out of 3000 people in the U.S. Nearly half of affected children have a limited ability to crawl and walk and a majority of them rely on the use of assistive devices for mobility [1]. Exploratory kicking motion in infants is essential for developing the coordination between the knee and hip joints, which leads to crawling and eventually the development of a coordinated gait [2]. Because infants with cerebral palsy tend to exhibit very little independent motion during the kicking stage, they often have gait deficiencies that limit their ability to walk when they reach adulthood [3].

Cerebral palsy is typically not diagnosed until the age of two, when a child starts walking and abnormal gait patterns become apparent. At that point, the abnormalities are difficult if not impossible to correct without costly and invasive treatment methods. On...

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