A goal of gait therapy for many patients is to increase the walking speed to a level that will allow effective community ambulation. The use of cues can be helpful during therapy to improve step length, cadence, or both. A recent study of 29 subjects with incomplete spinal cord injury found that visuotemporal cues provided by a mechanical device led to clinically significant increases in walking speed compared to other external (e.g., auditory and visual only) cues [1]. The mechanical device used in this recent study was a conveyor belt system that moved a tennis ball from left to right and in front of the subject. The gait therapy approach encouraged the subject to walk at a speed fast enough to grab the tennis ball in the middle of the conveyor belt. Although this system was well designed, it requires multiple therapists to...

References

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