The human ankle–foot system conforms to a circular effective rocker shape for walking and a flat effective shape for standing balance [1]. A simple model developed by Hansen and Wang suggests that a prosthetic ankle developed to provide biomimetic function for standing balance would need to be over three times as stiff as an ankle developed for walking [1]. Current prostheses have designs that focus on walking function. Development of systems that provide good function for both walking and standing may improve the balance confidence of their users, resulting in increased participation in social and community events.

An ankle–foot system was developed to support two distinct modes for standing and walking and a simple way to switch between these two modes (Fig. 1) [2]. The initial “bimodal ankle” design was manually controlled with a wireless key fob that...

References

References
1.
Hansen
,
A. H.
, and
Wang
,
C. C.
,
2010
, “
Effective Rocker Shapes Used by Able-Bodied Persons for Walking and Fore-Aft Swaying: Implications for Design of Ankle-Foot Prostheses
,”
Gait Posture
,
32
(
2
), pp.
181
184
.10.1016/j.gaitpost.2010.04.014
2.
Hansen
,
A. H.
, and
Nickel
,
E. A.
,
2013
, “
Development of a Bimodal Ankle-Foot Prosthesis for Walking and Standing/Swaying
,”
ASME J. Med. Devices
,
7
(
3
), p.
035001
.10.1115/1.4024646
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