Healthy hearts produce a “wringing” motion that reduces wall stress and helps the ventricles empty more completely, an observation that dates back to the 17th century and is now common knowledge among clinicians and cardiac researchers. What is less widely appreciated—and only recently brought to light with the advent of modern imaging techniques—is the fact that diseased hearts often lose this ability. Indeed, recent studies indicate that changes in ventricular twist dynamics accompany a surprising variety of cardiac disease states, including myocardial infarction, ectopic excitation, ventricular dilatation, aortic valve stenosis, and ventricular aneurysms. All of these disorders have been shown to alter the natural twisting motion of the heart, lowering cardiac efficiency, and accelerating the disease process.

Logically speaking, if the loss of ventricular torsion leads to increased wall stress and reduced stroke volumes, then it is reasonable to postulate that restoring torsion by mechanically...

Reference

Reference
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