The high risk and cost associated with falling in both elderly patients and those suffering from chronic impairment from dizziness or balance disorders demonstrate the need for an effective balance prosthesis, a device used to reduce imbalance and dizziness in patients with abnormal vestibular function [1]. This need has resulted in investigations of two primary types of balance prosthetics, implantable and nonimplantable. Due to surgical risks associated with an implantable device there is a clear need for further development of a nonimplantable device. Wearable devices capable of providing sensory feedback about balance have been shown to be effective in compensating for vestibular impairment [2] However, for a wearable device to be as effective as an implantable device in the patient’s daily life, it must take a form that is acceptable for long-term use: comfortable, unobtrusive, and aesthetically pleasing.

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References

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