Looping of the colonoscope shaft is the most common problem associated with a colonoscopy procedure. One study has shown that looping occurred in 91 out of 100 cases [1]. Looping can have a variety of effects ranging from extended procedure times, incomplete examinations, or even perforation of the colon wall [2]. Another study shows that 37 perforations occurred in 116,000 patients [3]. Looping increases discomfort for the patient, requiring larger amounts of anesthesia, and increasing operation time. Looping forces the doctor to reposition the colonoscope by twisting and retracting the shaft with varying degrees of success. This additional maneuvering of the colonoscope shaft during the procedure places extra stress on the inner lining of the colon wall.

The problem of looping can be lessened with the help of manipulation by the doctor. By applying pressure to the abdomen and...

References

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