With the advent of endoscopic sinus surgery in the late 1980's [1], a completely new surgical field was born. The endoscope, passed through the natural orifice of the nose, allowed for much more precise visualization of the operative field and enabled a new understanding of the function of the sinuses. Today, functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) is commonly used to improve the sinuses' natural drainage pathways in patients with chronic sinusitis, to remove pathologies such as nasal polyps and tumors, and even to access the skull base to remove brain tumors.

Commonly used angled endoscopes allow for visualization of nearly every portion of the sinus cavities and skull base. However, traditional tools have not enabled adequate surgical access to all of these areas. This is because the current surgical method requires a nearly direct line of access from the opening of the nose to the surgical target. Due...

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