Heart failure occurs when either or both ventricles of the heart cannot pump sufficient blood to meet the metabolic needs of the body. While symptoms vary widely depending on which ventricle is failing and the underlying cause, the standard indicator of failure is low ejection fraction, which is the volumetric proportion of blood ejected when the ventricle contracts. Effective therapies for heart failure target the etiology, but treatment of symptoms is also necessary to sustain patient health and quality of life. Though early-stage heart failure can be treated with drugs, more advanced cases require support from a ventricular assist device (VAD) [1]. Such devices assume some or all of the heart's pumping work, unloading the heart and restoring normal circulation, until the patient recovers or a transplant becomes available.

Due to its more complex geometry and motion, right ventricular heart failure (RVHF) is...

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