A continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) that Penn State University (PSU) has developed utilizes Tesla turbomachinery technology [1,2]. We recently tested the second version of the PSU Tesla LVAD; the size of the pump was significantly reduced while avoiding any degradation of hemodynamic and hemolytic characteristics. The primary goal of this study is to examine the (i) hydrodynamic performance and (ii) wall shear stresses on the volute and rotor. The secondary goal is design optimization in terms of the pump efficiency by varying design parameters such as (i) number of disks, (ii) disk gap spacing, and (iii) shape of the back cap (with or without a sharp fluid guider). Design iteration studies were performed at 6000 rpm and a range of flow rates from 2 to 8 lpm.

The pump consists of a suspended rotor that has 11 disks constructing...

References

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