Additive Manufacturing (AM) has been called the Second Industrial Revolution [1]. This technology allows a three dimensional shape defined in digital space to be directly rendered into a tangible object. The transformation from virtual object to tangible object by AM is fast and inexpensive compared to most traditional fabrication approaches. Thus, the revolutionary aspect of additive fabrication is not uniform mass production of the first Industrial Revolution, but mass customization of manufactured devices [2].

The history of surgical instruments, such as the forceps, shows an evolution of devices meant to augment the dexterity of the human hand [3]. Materials used for these instruments followed the technology of the era, bronze instruments in the Bronze Age giving way to iron instruments in the Iron Age. By the 17th Century surgical instruments were constructed by skilled smiths and were often...

References

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