In recent years, surgical robotic systems (SRS) have been employed to great effect in a wide range of minimally invasive procedures [1]. Yet despite the increasing use of these devices in clinical practice, there exists to date no definitive, objective system of measurement of the skill level of a surgeon using an SRS. Assessments of patient outcomes, surgical speed and instrument docking time have shown that improvement in skill using an SRS requires in-depth training, with exposure to as many as 20 cases of a given procedure to attain proficiency [2].

The model employed for the certification of a surgeon in the practice of minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery has addressed a parallel problem since its inception by establishing a set of exercises comprising what is now known as the fundamentals of laparoscopic surgery (FLS) assessment [3]. This high stakes...

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