In current practice, surgeons use suction and irrigation to clear the field of view during procedures. Devices designed for suction often employ a strong negative pressure (vacuum). This negative pressure may result in tissue damage and/or occlusion of the device lumen [1]. This occlusion significantly compromises the ability to suction, creating inefficiencies and delays in the surgical procedure. To prevent this problem, some surgeons will place a sponge on the target area before applying suction, thereby reducing the negative pressure to which tissue is exposed. In laparoscopic surgery, sponges are inserted through laparoscopic-size incisions or ports and then tracked to ensure eventual removal. This process may be time consuming and may make control of hemorrhage more difficult [2]. This paper describes the design and development of a laparoscopic device that combines suction and irrigation with a novel sponge suction technique to...

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