Treatment of battlefield trauma presents a unique set of challenges, among which is the logistical challenge of providing sterile surgical instruments to surgeons. Transport and supply constraints limit the quantity and variety of surgical instruments available in the field and sterilization equipment is often not available to support the instruments on hand. Furthermore, it is difficult to predict and supply the exact type and quantity of instruments needed by a surgeon in the field.

New manufacturing technology offers a compelling solution to overcome the logistical challenge. Durable, biocompatible plastic resins can be formed into any shape using commercially available additive manufacturing devices. This technology is already having an impact on healthcare with the production of custom shaped prostheses and implants [1]. A 2009 SBIR/STTR grant solicitation from the National Institutes of Health, suggested that additive manufacturing technologies could be employed for on demand...

References

References
1.
Lipson
,
H.
,
2012
, “
Frontiers in Additive Manufacturing The Shape of Things to Come
,”
The Bridge
,
42
(
1
), pp.
5
12
.
2.
National Institutes of Health
,
2009
, “
Manufacturing Processes of Medical, Dental, and Biological Technologies (SBIR [R43/R44]), PA-09-113
,” http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-09-113.html#SectionI
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