The use of surgically implanted or nonsurgically inserted medical devices has received more interest in modern medical practices. This is due to a result of their beneficial effect on quality of life and in some circumstances, on patient survival rates. Upon implantation or insertion into patient’s body for exerting the intended purpose such as salvage of normal functions of vital organs, these medical devices are unfortunately becoming the sites of competition between host cell integration and microbial adhesion. Moreover, the nonshedding surfaces of these devices provide ideal substrata for colonization by biofilm-forming microbes. Hence, the incidence of biofilm- and medical devices-related nosocomial infections is also increasing progressively. Therefore, a fundamental concept in the pathogenesis of device-related infections is the formation of biofilms by the infecting microorganisms. This multiauthored book starts with a chapter that analyzes the primary source of indwelling medical...

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