Orthopedic residency training is in the midst of a paradigm shift. In 2012, the Residency Review Committee (RRC) for Orthopaedic Surgery and the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) mandated that there must be structured motor skills training for first-year residents [1]. Taking from other disciplines such as laparoscopic surgery, surgical simulators have emerged as the tools by which first-year orthopedic residents can practice and acquire these motor skills. However, in a 2011 national survey of program directors and residents, it was shown that one of the greatest barriers to training residents was cost [2]. This study further showed that most programs would only be able to afford a simulator costing between $1000 and $15,000. This is a contrast to many virtual reality simulators currently available, which can easily cost upward of $100,000.

In its mandate, the ABOS also defined a...

References

References
1.
ACGME, 2014, “ACGME Orthopaedic Surgery Requirements,” Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, Chicago, IL, Last accessed Oct. 26, 2015, http://www.acgme.org/acgmeweb/tabid/140/ProgramandInstitutionalAccreditation/SurgicalSpecialties/OrthopaedicSurgery.aspx
2.
Karam
,
M. D.
,
Pedowitz
,
R. A.
,
Natividad
,
H.
,
Murray
,
J.
, and
Marsh
,
J. L.
,
2013
, “
Current and Future Use of Surgical Skills Training Laboratories in Orthopaedic Resident Education: A National Survey
,”
J. Bone Jt. Surg. Am.
,
95
(
1
), p.
e4(1-8)
.
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