Bioprinting is an emerging field that has advanced the process of tissue engineering using 3D printing technology. In situ bioprinting has been investigated at other institutions, wherein the tissue is printed cell-by-cell directly onto the site of interest [1,2]. However, these printing systems assumed rigid and fixtured target anatomy. In situations such as printing onto a moving hand, a pulsing blood vessel or a beating heart, this assumption cannot be met. This investigation demonstrates the design process for the robotic linkage of a printing system that can track and print on moving anatomy.

Prior attempts at tracking and drawing on a hand used a commercial robotic arm [3]. This solution was expensive, bulky and unsafe for the task. It is shown here that an inexpensively manufactured two-link robotic arm that is kinematically optimized for hand motion can deliver the...

References

References
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Binder
,
K. W.
,
Zhao
,
W.
,
Aboushwareb
,
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,
Dice
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D.
,
Atala
,
A.
, and
Yoo
,
J. J.
,
2010
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In Situ Bioprinting of the Skin for Burns
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2.
Institute for Regenerative Medicine
, “
Printing Skin Cells on Burn Wounds
,” Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, accessed Jan. 26, 2016, http://www.wakehealth.edu/Research/WFIRM/Research/Military- Applications/Printing-Skin-Cells-On-Burn-Wounds.htm
3.
O'Neill
,
J. J.
, and
Kowalewski
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T. M.
,
2014
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Online Free Anatomy Registration Via Noncontact Skeletal Tracking for Collaborative Human/Robot Interaction in Surgical Robotics
,”
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,
8
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