A wide array of cardiac assist devices are currently used to treat patients suffering from the later stages of congestive heart failure (HF). The majority of the devices available in the market today are ventricular-assist devices (VADs), which feature a blood pump—either pulsatile or continuous flow—that is, cannulated in the left ventricle as a means to provide cardiac support. These VADs are especially effective in the short term (days to months) but are plagued by several longstanding problems with chronic use. These include: the need for long-term systemic anticoagulation strategy; invasive surgery for device deployment; complications arising from broken or worn parts; and kinked or infected percutaneous drive lines. Thus, there is a need for improved technologies that can minimize or eliminate these adverse events.

Here, we report the development of a device designed to rotate the apex of the heart during the systolic portion...

References

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