Prior to the development of sophisticated computer numerical control (CNC), both face milling (FM) and face hobbing (FH), the two most popular technologies for bevel gear production, required cradle-type machines with diverse and complicated mechanisms. In the last two decades, however, the gear industry has replaced these traditional machines with six-axis CNC bevel gear cutting machines that have superior efficiency and accuracy. One such machine is a vertical six-axis machine with a vertical spindle arrangement, which offers two industrially proven advantages: compact design and maximum machine stiffness. The technical details of this machine, however, remain undisclosed, so this paper proposes a mathematical model that uses inverse kinematics to derive the vertical machine's nonlinear six-axis coordinates from those of a traditional machine. The model also reduces manufacturing errors by applying an effective flank correction method based on a sensitivity analysis of how slight variations in the individual machine setting coefficients affects tooth geometry. We prove the model's efficacy by first using the proposed equations to derive the nonlinear coordinates for pinion and gear production and then conducting several cutting experiments on the gear and its correction. Although the numerical illustration used for this verification is based only on FM bevel gears produced by an SGDH cutting system, the model is in fact applicable in the production of both FM and FH bevel gears.

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