Abstract

Bioprinting is the fabrication of structures based on layer-by-layer deposition of biomaterials. Applications of bioprinting using plant or algae cells include the production of metabolites for use in pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food industries. Reported studies regarding effects of extrusion pressure and needle diameter on cell viability in bioprinting have used animal cells. There are no reports regarding effects of extrusion pressure and needle diameter on cell viability using plant or algae cells. This paper fills this knowledge gap by reporting an experimental investigation on effects of extrusion pressure and needle diameter on cell quantity (an indicator of cell viability) in extrusion-based bioprinting of hydrogel-based bioink containing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae cells. Extrusion pressure levels used in this study were 3, 5, and 7 bar, and needle diameter levels were 200, 250, and 400 µm. Algae cell quantity in printed samples was measured on the third day and sixth day post bioprinting. Results show that, when extrusion pressure increases or needle diameter decreases, algae cell quantity in printed samples will decrease.

This content is only available via PDF.
You do not currently have access to this content.