The erection of structural building frames, like that of other mechanical assemblies, involves the use of handling systems and connection technologies. A new “chamfered” connection, now known as the ATLSS Connection, has been developed to both facilitate the framing assembly task and provide adequate connection strength through the life of the building. This paper outlines the methodology and technical details used in developing the connection geometry from an insertion mechanics point of view. Although framing of buildings is explicitly addressed here, the approach is just as viable for other mechanical assemblies. Parameters associated with the connection geometry are defined and used in simulations of possible insertion trajectories. The insertion forces and moments are used to determine the fine details of the trajectory. It was found that the geometric parameters greatly affect the maximum allowable amount of initial misalignment between the beam and the two mating columns as well as the stiffness of the connection and its ability to be easily inserted.

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