Abstract

The work presented here seeks to compare different means of providing uniflow scavenging for a 2-stroke engine suitable to power a US light-duty truck. The three different configurations which could utilize this type of scavenging system that were investigated are (1) the opposed-piston engine, which has been applied to aircraft propulsion as well as engines for power generation and rail traction, (2) the poppet-valve uniflow configuration, as exemplified by the Detroit Diesel 2-stroke engine, and (3) the sleeve-valve uniflow engine, the unusual arrangement of which was used in the Rolls-Royce Crecy, intended for high-speed interceptor aircraft application. All of these concepts were compared in terms of indicated fuel consumption for the same cylinder swept volume, and a new methodology for optimization was developed using a one-dimensional engine simulation package which also took into account charging system work.

As a result of this work it was found that the opposed-piston configuration provides the best attributes since it allows maximum expansion and minimum heat transfer. It was found that existing experiential guidelines for port angle-area specification for loop-scavenged, piston ported engines using crankcase compression could also be applied to all of the other scavenging types. This has not been demonstrated before.

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
This content is only available via PDF.

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this content.