It is well known that turbocharged diesel engines suffer from an inadequate response to sudden load increase, this being a consequence of the nature of the energy exchange between the engine and the turbocharger. The dynamic response of turbocharged diesel engines could be improved by electric assisting systems, either by direct energy supply with an integrated starter-generator-booster (ISG) mounted on the engine flywheel, or indirect energy supply with an electrically assisted turbocharger. A previously verified zero dimensional computer simulation method was used for the analysis of both types of electrical assistance. The credibility of the data presented is further assured by the experimentally determined characteristics of the electric motors used as input parameters of the simulation. The paper offers an analysis of the interaction between a turbocharged diesel engine operating under various load conditions and electric assisting systems, as well as the requirements for supporting electric motors suitable for the improvement of an engine’s dynamic response. It is evident that an electrically assisted turbocharger outperforms an integrated starter-generator-booster for vehicle application, however ISG is the preferred solution when instant power increase is demanded.

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