The geometry of the skewed boundary layer is described, and two methods of producing it are discussed. Experimental results show that the form of the usual skewed boundary layer is a thin collateral sublayer under a quasi-collateral outer region. The geometry of separation of a skewed boundary layer is discussed. It is concluded that separation of a skewed boundary layer may differ radically from that of a collateral boundary layer and that separation criteria used for collateral boundary layers may give misleading results when applied to skewed boundary layers. It is concluded that the understanding of the skewed boundary layer can contribute to improved design of turbomachinery.

This content is only available via PDF.
You do not currently have access to this content.