A Navier-Stokes solver based on artificial compressibility and pseudo-time stepping, coupled with the energy equation, is used to model the thermodynamic effects of cavitation in cryogenic fluids. The analysis is restricted to partial sheet cavitation in two-dimensional cascades. Thermodynamic effects of cavitation assume significance in cryogenic fluids because these fluids are generally operated close to the critical point and also because of the strong dependence of the vapor pressure on the temperature. The numerical approach used is direct and fully nonlinear, that is, the cavity profile evolves as part of the solution for a specified cavitation pressure. This precludes the necessity of specifying the cavity length or the location of the inception point. Numerical solutions are presented for two-dimensional flow problems and validated with experimental measurements. Predicted temperature depressions are also compared with measurements for liquid hydrogen and nitrogen. The cavitation procedure presented is easy to implement in engineering codes to provide satisfactory predictions of cavitation. The flexibility of the formulation also allows extension to more complex flows and/or geometries.

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