We review the chemical equilibrium equations, and conclude that both their derivation and their meaning are problematic. We find that these equations can be established for a suitably defined simple system without chemical reactions.

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All the results can be readily extended also to systems with other parameters in addition to volume, such as, for example, the location in a uniform gravity field, and the intensity of a uniform electrostatic or magnetostatic field.
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