The thermoeconomic diagnosis strategy introduced in the accompanying paper [Verda, V., Serra, L., Valero, A. 2004. Thermoeconomic Diagnosis: Zooming Strategy Applied to Highly Complex Energy Systems. Part 1: Detection and Localization of Anomalies. Part 1: The diagnosis procedure. ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol. 127(1), pp. 42–49. This issue.] is a zooming technique consisting of a successive localization of anomalies. At each step the required productive structure to be adopted becomes even more detailed, focusing the analysis on a more specific part of the system. The detail of a productive structure has two different levels: the number of components and the number of productive flows. The first one is selected according to the precision desired in locating the anomalies. A larger number of components (or subsystems) allows one to locate the anomalies in smaller control volumes, providing more precise indications for maintenance. The number of flows is partially dependent on the number of components. Once the number of components is fixed, the productive flows can be increased by separating exergy into its components or introducing fictitious flows, such as negentropy [see, for example, C. A. Frangopoulos, Energy, The International Journal 12(7), pp. 563–571 (1987)]. This decision also affects the results of the thermoeconomic analysis when it is adopted for diagnosis purposes. In this paper, the effects of the productive structure on the diagnosis results are carefully analyzed. Depending on the selected productive structure, the accuracy of the diagnosis results can be significantly improved.

1.
Verda V., Serra L., and Valero A, 2002, “Thermoeconomic Diagnosis: Zooming Strategy Applied to Highly Complex Energy Systems. Part 1: Detection and Localization of Anomalies,” ASME IMECE, New Orleans.
2.
Frangopoulos
,
C. A.
,
1987
, “
Thermoeconomic Functional Analysis and Optimization
,”
Energy Int. J.
,
12
(
7
), pp.
563
571
.
3.
Torres, C., Valero, A., Serra, L., and Royo, J., 1999. “Structural Theory and Thermoeconomic Diagnosis. Part I: On Malfunction and Dysfunction Analysis,” Proceedings of the ECOS’99, pp. 368–373, ASME, Tokyo, Japan.
4.
Reini, M., 1994, “Analisi e Sviluppo dei Metodi Termoeconomici per lo Studio degli impianti di Conversione dell’Energia,” Ph.D. thesis, Universita` di Padova.
5.
Tsatsaronis G, Pisa, J. J., and Lin L., 1990. “The Effect of Assumption on the Detailed Exergoeconomic Analysis of a Steam Power Plant Design Configuration part I: Theoretical Development,” Flowers, 1990, A Future for Energy, Florence, Italy.
6.
Verda, V., Serra, L., and Valero, A., 2001, “The effects of the regulation system on the thermoeconomic diagnosis of a power plant. Part 1: The diagnosis procedure,” ECOS 2001, Efficiency, Costs, Optimization, Symulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, July 4–6, Istanbul, Turkey.
7.
Valero, A., Lerch, F., Serra, L., and Royo, J., 1999, “Structural Theory and Thermoeconomic Diagnosis. Part II: Application to an Actual Power Plant,” Proceedings of the ECOS’99 Conference, pp. 374–379, ASME, Tokyo, Japan.
8.
Verda
,
V.
,
Serra
,
L.
, and
Valero
,
A.
,
2005
, “
Thermoeconomic Diagnosis: Zooming Strategy Applied to Highly Complex Energy Systems. Part 1: Detection and Localization of Anomalies
,”
ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol.
127
, pp.
42
49
.
9.
Verda, V., 2001, “Thermoeconomic Diagnosis of an Urban District Heating System based on Cogenerative Steam and Gas Turbines,” Ph.D. thesis, Polytechnic of Turin and University of Zaragoza.
10.
Verda, V., Serra, L., and Valero, A., 2001, “A procedure for filtering the induced effects in the thermoeconomic diagnosis of an energy system” ASME IMECE, New York.
11.
Valero A., Torres C., and Lerch F., 1999, “Structural Theory and Thermoeconomic Diagnosis. Part III: Intrinsic and Induced Malfunctions,” ECOS 99, Efficiency, Costs, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Aspects of Energy Systems, June 8–10, Tokyo, Japan.
12.
Stoppato, A., and Lazzaretto, A., 1996, “The Exergetic Analysis for Energy System Diagnosis,” AES, Thermodynamics and the Design, Analysis and Improvement of Energy Systems, A. B. Duncan, J. Fiszdon, D. O’Neal, and K. Den Braven, eds., pp. 191–198, ASME, New York.
You do not currently have access to this content.