The application of pyrolytic laser chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) to repair defects on multichip modules with a high circuit density requires tight control of the dimensions of the deposited metal. It is shown that by creating micro-channels into the substrate on both sides along the laser scan path, shorting to adjacent lines is eliminated and better control of deposited metal is achieved. A finite element model shows how the presence of the micro-channels reduces the temperature in the deposited material in the direction perpendicular to the laser scan, causing the deposition process to self-limit in this direction.

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