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Pipeline System Automation and Control

By
Mike S. Yoon
Mike S. Yoon
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C. Bruce Warren
C. Bruce Warren
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Steve Adam
Steve Adam
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ISBN-10:
0791802639
ISBN:
9780791802632
No. of Pages:
450
Publisher:
ASME Press
Publication date:
2007

This chapter discusses the history, architecture, and application of supervisory control systems in general and how they apply to gas and liquid pipelines in particular. The components and structure of SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) are similar for both gas and liquid pipelines; the major differences are in the associated operating and business applications. Chapters 4 through 8 discuss applications in detail.

SCADA is an acronym for Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition. A SCADA system is a computer-based data acquisition system (often referred to as a SCADA host) designed to gather operating data from an array of geographically remote field locations, and to transmit this data via communication links to one or more control center location(s) for display, control and reporting. Operators at one or more control centers monitor this data. They may then issue commands of a supervisory nature to the remote locations in response to the incoming data. Additionally, software programs implemented within the SCADA host can provide for specific responses to changes in field conditions, by reporting such changes or automatically sending commands to remote field locations. SCADA systems are used for controlling diverse networks such as electrical generating, transmission and distribution systems, gas and oil production distribution and pipeline transmission and water distribution systems. It must be noted that a SCADA system is designed to assist pipeline operators in the operation of the pipeline system using real-time and historical information, but not to provide a closed-loop control function.

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