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Advanced Multifunctional Lightweight Aerostructures: Design, Development, and Implementation
By
Kamran Behdinan
Kamran Behdinan
University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
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Rasool Moradi-Dastjerdi
Rasool Moradi-Dastjerdi
University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
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ISBN:
9781119756712
No. of Pages:
256
Publisher:
ASME-Wiley
Publication date:
2021

Material properties are highly dependent on the hierarchy of length and temporal scales experienced by the structure, where atomic levels can influence characterized structures through certain features pertaining to atomic species, their orientations and crystal types. Analyzing such features with the underlying atomic group symmetry is necessary to characterize hierarchical properties that are influenced from external stimuli, load rates, and sample sizes. In hierarchical multiscale models, one can obtain certain properties at larger scales by analyzing a smaller scale for material properties and/or mechanics and bridge such properties to the higher scale in a sequential fashion [1]. It depends on the nature of the material on how small a level one can go without sacrificing details to understand themacroscopic behavior. For example, nanocomposites reinforced with carbon nanotubes must be analyzed in an atomic scale to develop a hierarchical relationship with respect to the nanotube’s orientation, structure and size for dynamic, mechanical and structural composite properties [1]. Stimuli responsive behavior that alters the crystalline structure may require an analysis of crystalline features. Two common methods of characterizing crystalline structures are centrosymmetry parameter (CSP) [2, 3] and common neighbor analysis (CNA) [4, 5]. Despite being well defined for characterization of local deformation and distinctive atomic arrangements through atomic neighbor topologies, such methods are reported to work for simplified structures (such as face centered cube [FCC], body centered cube [BCC] and hexagonal close packed [HCP] structures) that do not distinguish the atomic space group symmetries. Hence, more advanced crystal characterization methods are desirable when considering structures with non-centrosymmetric, multiple atomic species and multiple space group arrangements.

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