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Electromagnetic Waves and Heat Transfer: Sensitivities to Governing Variables in Everyday Life

By
M. Kemal Atesmen
M. Kemal Atesmen
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ISBN:
9780791883648
No. of Pages:
226
Publisher:
ASME Press
Publication date:
2021

Approximately 35% of energy released from a nuclear explosion is in the form of thermal radiation. Surface of a nuclear explosion fireball emits large amounts of ultraviolet, visible and infrared rays in the first few seconds after a nuclear explosion. Approximately 50% of energy released from a nuclear explosion is in the form of a pressure wave called a shock wave or it is also called a blast wave for air bursts. This pressure wave develops immediately after the burst and moves outward from the growing fireball. Approximately 5% of energy released from a nuclear explosion is characterized as the initial nuclear radiation that is produced in the first minute of the explosion and which produces high energy neutrons and gamma rays with wavelengths less than 10-4 μm. Approximately 10% of energy released from a nuclear explosion is characterized as the residual nuclear radiation that emits gamma rays and beta particles due to delayed radioactivity of explosion residues.

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