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Flow Induced Vibration of Power and Process Plant Components: A Practical Workbook

By
M. K. Au-Yang, Ph.D., P.E.
M. K. Au-Yang, Ph.D., P.E.
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ISBN-10:
0791801667
No. of Pages:
494
Publisher:
ASME Press
Publication date:
2001

Under normal conditions, axial flow-induced vibrations of power and process plant components are of much less concern than cross-flow-induced vibrations with comparable flow velocities and fluid densities. Because of this and because industry research effort over the past 20 years has been focused on cross-flow-induced vibration, axial flow-induced vibration is often overlooked in the industry. A detailed review of the operating history of commercial nuclear power, in which detailed documentation of every flow-induced vibration incident is required by law and is available to the public, revealed that in the last 40 years, axial flow-induced vibration has caused as much monetary loss to the industry as cross-flow-induced fluid-elastic instability and vortex-induced vibration combined.

In the absence of narrow flow channels, axial flow-induced vibration can be estimated by three different methods:

1) The acceptance integral method developed in Chapter 8 for parallel-flow-induced vibration.

2) Equation of Wambsganss and Chen (1971) which estimates the minimum response of a rod or a tube subject to axial flow,
yrms(x)=0.0255κγD1.5DH1.5V2ψ(x)L0.5f1.5mtζ
3) Paidoussis' (1981) equation, which estimate the upper bound responses,
ymaxD=(5E4)Kα4{u1.6ε1.8Re0.251+u2}{DhD}0.4{β231+4β}
Summary
Nomenclature
10.1 Introduction
10.2 Turbulence-Induced Vibration in Axial Flow
10.3 Some Simplified Equations for External Axial Flow
Example 10.1
Example 10.2
10.4 Stability of Pipes Conveying Fluid
Buckling Instability
Example 10.3
10.5 Leakage-Flow-Induced Vibration
Rules to Avoid Leakage-Flow-Induced Vibration
10.6 Components Prone to Axial and Leakage-Flow-Induced Vibration
The Cavitating Venturi
The Common Faucet
Lift Check Valves
Tube-in-Tube Slip Joint
Reactor Control Rods
10.7 Case Studies in Axial and Leakage-Flow-Induced Vibrations
Case Study 10.1: Boiling Water Reactor Thermal Shield
Case Study 10.2: Feedwater Sparger Thermal Sleeve
Case Study 10.3: Surveillance Specimen Holder Tube
Case Study 10.4: Kiwi Nuclear Rocket
References
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