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The Unwritten Laws of Engineering: With Revisions and Additions

By
James G. Skakoon
James G. Skakoon
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W. J. King
W. J. King
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ISBN-10:
0791801624
No. of Pages:
60
Publisher:
ASME Press
Publication date:
2001

Never misrepresent a subordinate's performance during performance appraisals.

The most serious responsibility of managers is to review the performance of their subordinates. As a manager, you have the distinct obligation to do this as accurately as possible. Not only would misrepresentation be unfair to your subordinates, it would not be the least bit helpful to anyone involved.

Along the same line, it is your inalienable responsibility to talk things over with employees if — and as soon as — you become sincerely dissatisfied with their work, or you recognize deficiencies that are working against them. To be sure, this is not always easy, and it will require much tact to avoid discouraging or offending them, but you owe it to them. Bear this in mind: If you ultimately must fire a subordinate, you may have two pointed questions to answer: “Why has it taken you five years to discover my incompetence?” and “Why haven't you given me a fair chance to correct these shortcomings?” Remember that when you fire someone for incompetence, it means not only that the employee has failed, but also that you have failed.

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