Skip to Main Content
Skip Nav Destination
Technical Writing A–Z: A Commonsense Guide to Engineering Reports and Theses (U.S. Edition)
By
Trevor M. Young
Trevor M. Young
Search for other works by this author on:
ISBN-10:
0791802361
No. of Pages:
240
Publisher:
ASME Press
Publication date:
2005

Abbreviated terms

■ Abbreviations (shortened forms of words), acronyms (words formed from the initial letters of other words), and initialisms (groups of letters, which are pronounced separately, taken from the initial letters of other words) usually require an explanation. The general rule is to spell out the full name when the item is first mentioned, followed by the abbreviation in parentheses—for example: Onboard Oxygen Generating Systems (OBOGS)—and thereafter to use the abbreviation. You can underline the letters that make up the abbreviation if you wish—for example: ANOVA (Analysis of variance).

■ When the abbreviated term is itself widely understood (e.g., AIDS, DNA, NATO), it is not necessary to give the full name in the text; however, it could still be included in the list of abbreviations for completeness (DNA can also mean Distributed interNet Application).

■ It is common practice not to use periods with such abbreviations (Internet Protocol, for example, would be written as IP rather than I.P.). Plurals are formed by adding an s without an apostrophe.

Abbreviated terms
Abbreviations (common)
Abbreviations (of journals)
Abstract
Acknowledgements
Acronyms
Aims
Alphabetical arrangement (of lists)
Annex
APA Manual
Appendix
ASCII
Assessment report
Assumptions and approximations
Background
Bad results
Bibliography
Capitalization
CBE/CSE Manual
Chapters and sections
Characteristic numbers
Charts
Chemical elements, compounds, and symbols
Chicago Manual of Style
Citing references (basic rules)
Citing references (examples of author-date method)
Citing references (examples of numeric method)
Citing references located on the Internet
Citing something second-hand
Citing standards
Concluding remarks
Conclusions
Confusables
Contents
Continuity
Conversion factors
Copyright
Criticism of others
Cross-referencing
CSE Manual
Data presentation
Dedication
Diagrams
Dictionary
Discussion
Emphasis by typeface change
Endnotes
Engineering report
Epigraph
Equations
Errata
Error analysis (measurements)
Et al.
Excerpts (extracts)
Executive summary
Fair-use doctrine
Figures
Font
Footnotes and endnotes
Formal writing
Format (of report)
Format style
Fowler's Modern English Usage
Front cover
Future work
This content is only available via PDF.
You do not currently have access to this chapter.
Close Modal

or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal