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Decision Making in Engineering Design

Editor
Kemper E. Lewis
Kemper E. Lewis
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Wei Chen
Wei Chen
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Linda C. Schmidt
Linda C. Schmidt
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ISBN-10:
0791802469
No. of Pages:
400
Publisher:
ASME Press
Publication date:
2006

People routinely compare similar instantiations of objects or classes of objects in which they are interested, whether they are digital cameras, colleges or potential spouses. Designers are routinely charged with, first, generating or creating a set of alternatives, and, second, choosing one of them as the most preferred. Thus, designers routinely rank objectives, design attributes and designs using decision-centric methods and techniques, many of which are variants of the standard pair-by-pair pairwise comparison [1–8]. The common underlying concept in these methods, now all embodied within the rubric of decision-based design (DBD), is that some part of design thinking can be represented and modeled as a decision-making process that is aimed at addressing the need for a rational way to choose among alternatives. But, which part of the design process—or perhaps how much of the design process—is decision-making? We attempt to address such questions based very much on a prior analysis [9], some of which was also detailed in [10], and augmented in part by a recent inquiry into design thinking, teaching and learning [11].

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