The purpose of this paper is to propose an alternative approach to active noise control (ANC) using the least squares lattice (LSL) algorithm. Typically, in ANC applications, the least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm has been used because of its simplicity. However, the LMS algorithm has the disadvantage of slow convergence speed in the case of broadband noise, such as the road noise present in the passenger compartment of automobiles traveling on rough road surfaces. In order to solve this problem, the LSL algorithm for ANC is considered. By computer simulation using actual car data, the LSL algorithm proves to be more effective than the LMS one.

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