Abstract

The convergence characteristics of three geometrically-accurate spatial finite elements (FE) are examined in this study using an eigenvalue analysis. The spatial beam, plate, and solid elements considered in this investigation are suited for both structural and multibody system (MBS) applications. These spatial elements are based on geometry derived from the kinematic description of the absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF). In order to allow for an accurate reference-configuration geometry description, the element shape functions are formulated using constant geometry coefficients defined using the position-vector gradients in the reference configuration. The change in the position-vector gradients is used to define a velocity transformation matrix that leads to constant element inertia and stiffness matrices in the case of infinitesimal rotations. In contrast to conventional structural finite elements, the elements considered in this study can be used to describe the initial geometry with the same degree of accuracy as B-spline and NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline) representations, widely used in the computer-aided design (CAD). An eigenvalue analysis is performed to evaluate the element convergence characteristics in the case of different geometries, including straight, tapered, and curved configurations. The frequencies obtained are compared with those obtained using a commercial FE software and analytical solutions. The stiffness matrix is obtained using both the general continuum mechanics approach and the newly proposed strain split method (SSM) in order to investigate its effectiveness as a locking alleviation technique.

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