Abstract

Biomolecules in solutions subjected to extensional strain can form aggregates which may be important for our understanding of pathologies involving insoluble protein structures where mechanical forces are thought to be causative (i.e. tau fibers in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)). To examine the behavior of biomolecules in solution under mechanical strains requires applying rheological methods, often to very small sample volumes. There were two primary objectives in this investigation: 1) To probe flow-induced aggregation of proteins in microliter-sized samples and 2) To test the hypothesis that tau protein aggregates under extensional flow. Tau protein (isoform:3R 0N; 36.7 kDa) was divided into 10 microliter droplets and subjected to extensional strain in a modified tensiometer. Sixteen independent tests were performed where one test on a single droplet comprised 3 extensional events. To assess the rheological performance of the fluid/tau mixture, the diameter of the filament that formed during extension was tracked as function of time and analyzed for signs of aggregation (i.e. increased relaxation time). The results were compared to two molecules of similar and greater size (Polyethylene Oxide: PEO35, 35 kDa and PEO100, 100 kDa). Analysis showed that the tau protein solution and PEO35 are likely to have formed aggregates, albeit at relatively high extensional strain rates (~10kHz). The investigation demonstrates an extensional rheological method capable of determining the properties of protein solutions in microliter volumes and that tau protein can aggregate when exposed to a single extensional strain with potentially significant biological implications.

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