Fresh and frozen cartilage samples of the fetlock, carpus, and stifle were collected from 12 deceased horses. Half were measured immediately following extraction, and half were frozen for seven days and then measured. Seven indentations (various normalized displacements) were implemented with an indention rate of 0.1mm/s. Solid phase aggregate modulus (Ea), hyperelastic material constant (a), and fluid load fraction (F') of equine articular cartilage were assessed using the Ogden hyperelastic model. The properties were statistically compared in various joints (fetlock, carpus, and stifle), and between fresh and frozen samples using various statistical models. There was no statistical difference between the fetlock and carpus in the aggregate modulus (p=0.5084), while both were significantly different from the stifle (fetlock: p=0.0017 and carpus: p=0.0406). For the hyperelastic material constant, no statistical differences between joints were observed (p=0.3310). For the fluid load fraction, the fetlock and stifle comparison showed a difference (p=0.0333), while the carpus was not different from the fetlock (p=0.1563) or stifle (p=0.3862). Comparison between the fresh and frozen articular cartilage demonstrated no significant difference among the joints in the three material properties: p=0.9418, p=0.7031, and p=0.9313 for the aggregate modulus, the hyperelastic material constant, and the fluid load fraction, respectively.

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