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ASTM Manuals
Guidelines for the Selection and Training of Sensory Panel Members
Editor
Lisa Christina Beck
Lisa Christina Beck
Editor
1
Founder
of
Insight Factory LLC
,
US
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Terese Tamminen
Terese Tamminen
Editor
2
Associate Manager
of
Sensory Operations at General Mills in Minneapolis
,
MN,
US
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ISBN:
978-0-8031-7159-6
No. of Pages:
49
Publisher:
ASTM International
Publication date:
2023

This manual provides recommended procedures for the fundamental processes required for analytical sensory research: sensory acuity screening, selecting, training, and monitoring panelists. This includes assessors who will participate in discrimination testing, descriptive analysis, and product quality monitoring applications. Procedures provided in this manual will help ensure that any resulting sensory data collected from the analytical sensory panels will be more robust and reliable for decision making. Once assessors have been screened and qualified based on known differences, they can be selected for the appropriate analytical sensory panel. Assessors with demonstrated sensory acuity can reduce risks in decision making with actual research products. Selected panelists must be reasonably reliable in their measurements to be qualified to serve in a panel. Typical sensory acuity screening tests include product sets that include known differences in appearance, aroma, flavor, texture, hand feel, and skin feel. These sensory modalities are most commonly used in sensory evaluations and also are known as vision, audition, kinesthetics, pain receptors, and tactile sensations. These recommended procedures are designed for data from sensory analytical testing panels and do not apply to research involving measuring consumer acceptance, preference, or attitudes. Each product category or project will determine the types of sensory acuity screening that may be necessary for a specific task, including specific types of bitterness, potassium chloride, androsterone, odor identification, tactile discrimination, and a variety of other attributes, which are known to differ in the population.

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