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ASTM Selected Technical Papers
Pesticide Formulation and Delivery Systems: 40th Volume, Formulation, Application and Adjuvant Innovation
By
Curtis M. Elsik
Curtis M. Elsik
Symposium Chairperson and STP Editor
1
Indorama Ventures Oxides LLC
,
The Woodlands, TX,
US
Search for other works by this author on:
ISBN:
978-0-8031-7700-0
No. of Pages:
183
Publisher:
ASTM International
Publication date:
2020

A pesticide's rainfastness, or its ability to withstand rainfall, is an important factor that affects the efficacy of spray-applied foliar pesticides. The development of rainfastness adjuvants is of great significance to avoid pesticide loss due to rainfall and enhance its efficacy, thus reducing the usage amount of pesticides. Generally, there are two mechanisms for rainfastness: fast uptake by the plant (spreader) and strong adhesion to the surface (sticker). Herein, polymer stickers were used for rainfastness performance enhancement. We built up the rainfastness testing capability in the lab, validated the testing process, and and verified the technical hypothesis, thus developing a high-performance polymer sticker with good EPA status. The developed sticker showed excellent performance in lab evaluations with various pesticide formulations; more pesticide could clearly be retained after simulated rainfall washoff while incorporating the sticker. Furthermore, the bioassay test, which used a plant growth regulator as a research active, showed a dramatically enhanced inhibition ratio compared with a sample without a sticker adjuvant under conditions of no rain and heavy rain. Moreover, in the field test, incorporating the sticker adjuvant further improved the weed control effect of glufosinate to resist rainfall.

1.
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,
FAO Statistical Yearbook 2013
(
Rome, Italy
:
United Nations
,
2013
).
2.
Fujisawa
T.
,
Ichise
K.
,
Fukushima
M.
,
Katagi
T.
, and
Takimoto
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, “
Improved Uptake Model of Nonionized Pesticides to Foliage and Seed of Crops
,”
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
50
, no.
3
(
2002
) 532–537.
3.
Cohen
M.L.
and
Steinmetz
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, “
Foliar Washoff of Pesticides by Rainfall
,”
Environmental Science and Technology
20
, no.
5
(
1986
): 521–523.
4.
Symonds
B.L.
,
Thomson
N.R.
,
Lindsay
C.I.
, and
Khutoryanskiy
V.V.
, “
Rainfastness of Poly (Vinyl Alcohol) Deposits on Vicia faba Leaf Surfaces: From Laboratory-Scale Washing to Simulated Rain
,”
ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
8
, no.
22
(
2016
): 14220–14230.
5.
Field
R.F.
and
Bishop
N.G.
, “
Promotion of Stomatal Infiltration of Glyphosate by an Organosilicone Surfactant Reduces the Critical Rainfall Period
,”
Pesticide Science
24
(
1988
): 55–62.
6.
Green
J.M.
and
Beestman
G.B.
, “
Recently Patented and Commercialized Formulation and Adjuvant Technology
,”
Crop Protection
26
, no.
3
(
2007
): 320–327.
7.
Percival
G.C.
,
Keary
I.P.
, and
Marshall
K.
, “
The Use of Film-Forming Polymers to Control Guignardia Leaf Blotch and Powdery Mildew on Aesculus hippocastanum L. and Quercus Robur L
,”
Arboriculture & Urban Forestry
32
, no.
3
(
2006
): 100–107.
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