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ASTM Selected Technical Papers
Hydrogen Embrittlement: Prevention and Control
By
Louis Raymond
Louis Raymond
editor
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ISBN-10:
0-8031-0959-8
ISBN:
978-0-8031-0959-9
No. of Pages:
443
Publisher:
ASTM International
Publication date:
1988

For the last 35 years the American welding industry has placed limits on electrode coating moisture to control the hydrogen content of shielded metal arc (SMA) welds in order to minimize weld cracking in steels. Within the past several years, however, various tests have been proposed or developed for the direct measurement of diffusible hydrogen in welds. This report compares many of these tests with each other and with the coating moisture test.

The methods of measuring diffusible hydrogen that were compared were the International Institute of Welding (IIW) test (collection over mercury), the American Bureau of Shipping test (collection over glycerin), collection over silicone oil, a gas chromatographic technique, and several variations of the above. The gas chromatographic technique produced results that agreed within 15% with the IIW method, while the other test methods produced results that were often 50% smaller than the IIW value. The lower values were attributed to solubility of hydrogen in the collection media. It was therefore concluded that these two methods also produced the most reliable measure of the diffusible hydrogen content. The coating moisture was measured in the electrodes used and had a poor correlation with the diffusible hydrogen content.

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C. T.
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,”
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,” A5.5-81,
American Welding Society
,
Miami, FL
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, “
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4.
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Lloyds Register of Shipping
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6.
The Determination of the Hydrogen Content of Ferritic Arc Weld Metal
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American Council of the International Institute of Welding
,
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7.
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American Welding Society
,
Miami, FL
,
1983
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8.
Shutt
,
R. C.
and
Fink
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D. A.
, “
New Considerations for the Measurement and Understanding of Diffusible Hydrogen in Weld Metal
,”
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 0372-7203, Vol.
64
,
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9.
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American Bureau of Shipping
,
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,
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,
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, Jr.
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 0372-7203,
1981
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13.
Method for Measurement of Hydrogen Evolved from Gas Shielded Arc Welds
,” Draft JIS Standard, IIW Document No. II-A-567-82,
American Council of the International Institute of Welding
,
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,
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1983
.
15.
Hirai
,
Y.
,
Minakawa
,
S.
, and
Tsuboi
,
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, “
Prediction of Diffusible Hydrogen Content in Deposited Metals with Basic Type Covered Electrodes
,” IIW Document 11-929-80,
American Council of the International Institute of Welding
,
Miami, FL
.
16.
International Critical Tables of Numerical Data
,
Physics, Chemistry and Technology
,
McGraw-Hill
,
New York
,
1926
, p. 271.
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