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ASTM Selected Technical Papers
Thermal Insulation, Materials, and Systems for Energy Conservation in the '80s
By
FA Govan
FA Govan
1
Vice President of Professional Services
,
Ziel-Blossom & Associates, Inc.
,
Cincinnati, Ohio
;
conference chairman and editor
Search for other works by this author on:
DM Greason
DM Greason
2
Research Leader
,
Foam Products TS&D, Dow Chemical USA
,
Granville, Ohio
;
conference vice chairman — Technical Program and editor
Search for other works by this author on:
JD McAllister
JD McAllister
3
Senior Mechanical Engineer
,
American Electric Power Service Corporation
,
New York, N.Y.
;
conference co-chairman and editor
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ISBN-10:
0-8031-0230-5
ISBN:
978-0-8031-0230-9
No. of Pages:
905
Publisher:
ASTM International
Publication date:
1983

Vibration and impact testing of loose-fill cellulosic, fiberglass, and rock wool insulations has been carried out to provide a data base for settled density tests. The ratio of final density to initial density for the three materials has been determined for repeated 19-mm (0.75-in.) drops, repeated 152-mm (6.0-in.) drops, and vibrations at frequencies from 10 to 60 Hz with displacements from 0.1 mm (0.004 in.) to 6.35 mm (0.25 in.). Repeated 19-mm or 152-mm drops increased the density ratio for rock wool insulation specimens the most, while the cellulosic insulation specimens were affected the least. Density ratios after 200 19-mm drops averaged 1.75 for loose-fill rock wool, 1.45 for loose-fill fiberglass, and 1.27 for loose-fill cellulosic insulations.

Vibration tests for 7200 s at 0.1-mm displacement and 15 Hertz produced negligible changes in the densities of all three loose-fill insulations. An 1800-s vibration test at 2.5 mm (0.1 in.) and 10 Hz resulted in average density ratios of 1.05, 1.11, and 1.18 for specimens of loose-fill cellulosic, rock wool, and fiberglass insulations, respectively. Changes in either frequency of vibration, displacement, or test duration can be used to achieve a wide range of laboratory results. Efforts to correlate laboratory results with in situ density measurements are presented.

1.
Ceiling Vibrations in a Typical House: A Pilot Study
,” CR-7097A,
National Association of Home Builders Research Foundation
,
12
1978
.
2.
Medearis
,
K.
,
Sound and Vibration
, Vol.
12
,
11
1978
, pp. 23-27.
3.
Yarbrough
,
D. W.
and
Wright
,
J. H.
, “
The Effect of Vibrations on the Density of Loose-Fill Insulations
,” ORNL/Sub-7715/3,
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
,
Oak Ridge, Tenn.
,
05
1981
, pp. 4-9.
4.
Yarbrough
,
D. W.
and
Wright
,
J. H.
, “
Reduction in the Thermal Resistance (R-Value) of Loose-Fill Insulation and Fiberglass Batts Due to Compression
,” ORNL/Sub-7715/2,
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
,
Oak Ridge, Tenn.
,
04
1981
.
5.
Yarbrough
,
D. W.
,
McElroy
,
D. L.
, and
Harris
,
W. W.
, “
Properties and Testing of Loose-Fill Cellulosic Insulation
,” Technical Report ORNL/TM-6433,
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
, Oak Ridge, Tenn.,
02
1982
.
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