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ASTM Selected Technical Papers
Significance of Tests and Properties of Concrete and Concrete-Making Materials
By
R. C. Mielenz
R. C. Mielenz
1
The Master Builders Co.
, Division of Martin Marietta,
Cleveland, Ohio, chairman
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D. L. Bloem
D. L. Bloem
2
Nat. Ready Mixed Concrete Assn. and Nat. Sand and Gravel Assn.
,
Washington, D.C.
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L. E. Gregg
L. E. Gregg
3
Associates, Inc.
,
Lexington, Ky.
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L. E. Gregg
L. E. Gregg
3
Associates, Inc.
,
Lexington, Ky.
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C. E. Kesler
C. E. Kesler
4
University of Illinois
,
Urbana, Ill.
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W. H. Price
W. H. Price
5
Am. Cement Corp.
,
Los Angeles, Calif.
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ISBN:
978-0-8031-8109-0
No. of Pages:
582
Publisher:
ASTM International
Publication date:
1966

In evaluating resistance to high temperature, essentially every attribute and property of concrete merits consideration other than that of the concrete's resistance to freezing and thawing. These pertinent factors include items such as the quality of the ingredients, the design of the concrete mix, extent of curing and drying, volume change, thermal insulation, compatibility of aggregates and cement, carbonation, porosity, wetting and drying, and not least of all, strength. This complexity is real in spite of the fact that concrete is unquestionably accepted as the one structural material which has marked resistance to fire; consequently, any type or class of concrete is acknowledged by most laymen to be fire resistant. The specialist however, breaks the general category of concrete down into heavyweight, normal weight, lightweight, and ultra lightweight concretes, and further yet, into those made with natural or manufactured aggregates and with various kinds of hydraulic cement; he also gives due consideration to degree of exposure as well as ultimate use and purpose of the structure involved. A one-shot exposure to heat or fire is contrasted with repeated or continued exposure. Only a brief review is possible of the phenomena and facets whereby concretes attain these attributes. Further information may be obtained from the references.

1.
Zoldners
N. G.
,
Malhotra
V. M.
, and
Wilson
H. S.
, “
High-Temperature Behavior of Aluminous Cement Concretes Containing Different Aggregate
,”
Proceedings, Am. Soc. Testing Mats.
, Vol.
63
,
1963
, pp. 966–995.
2.
Miller
A. L.
and
Faulkner
H. F.
, “
A Comparison of the Effect of High Temperatures on Concrete of High Alumina and Ordinary Portland Cements
,” Bulletin No. 43,
University of Washington Engineering Experiment Station
,
Seattle, Wash.
,
1927
.
3.
Philleo
R.
, “
Some Physical Properties of Concrete at High Temperatures
,”
Proceedings, Am. Concrete Inst.
, Vol.
54
, April, 1958, pp. 857.
4.
Mitchell
L. J.
, “
Thermal Expansion Tests on Aggregates, Neat Cements, and Concrete
,”
Proceedings, Am. Concrete Inst.
, Vol.
53
,
1953
, p. 963.
5.
Meyers
S. L.
, “
Thermal Expansion Characteristics of Hardened Cement Paste and of Concrete
,”
Proceedings, Highway Research Board
, Vol.
30
,
1950
, pp. 193–203.
6.
Livovich
A. F.
, “
Portland vs. Calcium Aluminate Cements in Cyclic Heating Tests
,”
Ceramic Bulletin
, Vol.
40
, No.
9
,
1961
, pp. 559–562.
7.
Ingberg
S. H.
, “
Influence of Mineral Composition of Aggregates on Fire Resistance of Concrete
,”
Proceedings, Am. Soc. Testing Mats.
, Vol.
29
,
1929
, pp. 824–829.
8.
Verbeck
G. J.
and
Hass
W. E.
, “
Dilatometer Method for Determination of Thermal Coefficient of Expansion of Fine and Coarse Aggregate
,”
Proceedings, Highway Research Board
, Vol.
30
,
1950
, pp. 87–93.
9.
Bureau of Reclamation
,
Concrete Manual
, 7th edition,
1963
, pp. 60–61.
10.
Bishop
J. A.
, “
The Effect of Jet Aircraft on Airforce Pavements; Investigation Conducted by the Bureau of Yards and Docks
,”
Proceedings, Am. Society Civil Engrs.
, Separate 317, October, 1953.
11.
Harmathy
T. Z.
, “
Effect of Moisture on the Fire Endurance of Building Elements
,”
Moisture in Materials Relating to Fire Tests, ASTM STP 385
, May, 1965.
12.
Selvaggio
S. L.
and
Carlson
C. C.
, “
Fire Resistance of Prestressed Concrete Beams, Study B, Influence of Aggregate and Load Intensity
,”
Journal, Portland Cement Assn., Research & Development Laboratories
, January and May, 1964.
13.
Smith
Peter
, “
Investigation and Repair of Damage to Concrete Caused by Formwork and Falsework Fire
,”
Proceedings, Am. Concrete Inst.
, Vol.
60
, November, 1963, pp. 1535–1566.
14.
Carlson
C. C.
, “
Fire Endurance Testing Procedures
,”
Publication SP-5
,
Am. Concrete Inst.
1962
, pp. 3–22.
15.
Benjamin
I. A.
, “
Fire Resistance of Reinforced Concrete
,”
Publication SP-5
,
Am. Concrete Inst.
,
1962
, pp. 25–39.
16.
Sheridan
R. R.
, “
Fire Resistance with Concrete as Protection
,”
Publication SP-5
,
Am. Concrete Inst.
,
1962
, pp. 43–55.
17.
Troxell
G. E.
, “
Fire Resistance of Prestressed Concrete
,”
Publication SP-5
,
Am. Concrete Inst.
,
1962
, pp. 59–86.
18.
Menzel
C. A.
, “
Tests of the Fire Resistance and Thermal Properties of Solid Concrete Slabs and their Significance
,”
Proceedings, Am. Soc. Testing Mats.
, Vol.
43
.
19.
Malhotra
H. L.
, “
The Effect of Temperature on the Compressive Strength of Concrete
,”
Magazine Concrete Research
, Vol.
8
, No.
23
, August, 1956, pp. 85–94.
20.
Beller
William
, “
Martin Facility Testing Ablatives
,”
Missiles and Rockets
, Vol.
15
, No.
8
,
24
08
1964
, pp. 35–36.
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