Abstract

With the advent of advanced testing strategies such as laser-induced particle impact test, it is possible to study materials mechanics under extremely high deformation rates, i.e., above 106 s−1, a relatively less explored regime of strain rates. In this study, we accelerate microparticles of commercially pure titanium to a range of impact velocities, from 144 to 428 m/s, towards a rigid substrate and record their deformation upon impact in real time. We also conduct finite element modeling of the experimentally recorded impacts using two constitutive equations, namely, Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong. We show that the titanium microparticles experiences strain rates in the range of 106−1010 s−1 upon impact. We evaluate the capability of the Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong equations in predicting the deformation response of pure Ti at ultra-high strain rates. With an optimization-based constitutive modeling approach, we also propose updated strain rate-related constitutive parameters for both equations improving the extent to which the two models can describe the deformation of pure titanium at higher strain rates.

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