We conducted depth-of-penetration experiments with ogive-nose steel projectiles and limestone targets to determine the penetration limit velocity. The penetration limit velocity is defined as the minimum striking velocity required to embed the projectile in the target. For striking velocities smaller than the penetration limit velocity, the projectile rebounds from the target.

1.
Zukas, J. A., 1982, “Penetration and Perforation of Solids,” Impact Dynamics, John Wiley and Sons, New York, Chap. 5.
2.
Zukas, J. A., 1990, “Introduction to Penetration Mechanics,” High Velocity Impact Dynamics, John Wiley and Sons, New York, Chap. 4.
3.
Piekutowski
,
A. J.
,
Forrestal
,
M. J.
,
Poormon
,
K. L.
, and
Warren
,
T. L.
,
1999
, “
Penetration of 6061-T6511 Aluminum Targets by Ogive-Nose Steel Projectiles With Striking Velocities Between 0.5 and 3.0 km/s
,”
Int. J. Impact Eng.
,
23
, pp.
723
734
.
4.
Frew
,
D. J.
,
Forrestal
,
M. J.
, and
Hanchak
,
S. J.
,
2000
, “
Penetration Experiments With Limestone Targets and Ogive-Nose Steel Projectiles
,”
ASME J. Appl. Mech.
,
67
, pp.
841
845
.
5.
Hanchak, S. J., 1999, “Projectile Imbed/Rebound Parameters in Salem Limestone,” Interim Letter Report UD-TM-1999-00011, University of Dayton Research Institute, Dayton, OH.
6.
Brown, W. F., Mindlin, H., and Ho, C. Y., 1996, Aerospace Structural Metals Handbook, Vol. 1, Code 1206, CINDAS/USAF CRDA Handbooks Operation, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.
7.
Dahl
,
J.
,
1991
, “
Aer Met 100—An Advanced Steel for the Aerospace Industry
,”
Adv. Mat. Tech. Int.
,
pp.
40
45
.
You do not currently have access to this content.